classic | mobile
Follow us on:
Follow us on Facebook  Share via Twitter  Share via LinkedIn
 

Search...
Hi-Tech Security Solutions Business Directory
Residential Estate Security Handbook 2018


When cybercrime affects health and safety
April 2019, This Week's Editor's Pick, Cyber Security

Too often I read cybercrime articles where experts lay out a doomsday scenario without following through with strategies for tackling the issues. So today I want to do things differently, raising awareness of a significant problem, but also offering a simple approach to help you avoid it happening to your organisation.

Craig Gonzales
Craig Gonzales

As a matter of course, certain industries, such as oil and gas, manufacturing, and chemicals, already take human life into consideration when designing and planning work, using frameworks from disaster recovery planning through to checklists designed to avoid issues. These industries are well aware that disasters are usually caused by some combination of human error, dangerous working conditions, and faulty equipment.

The threat of a category one cyber-attack in these industries is that everything could seem right – the readings on the meter could be fine, checklists would be followed, and equipment would work as it’s supposed to – yet danger could still unfold. This was seen back in 2010 when the Stuxnet virus caused fast-spinning centrifuges to tear themselves apart. While this attack didn’t cost lives, it’s not improbable to imagine another attack that does have catastrophic consequences.

Serious cybercrime is around the corner

Ciaran Martin, CEO of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), outlines the stark reality of cybercrime today: “I remain in little doubt we will be tested to the full, as a centre, and as a nation, by a major incident at some point in the years ahead – what we would call a category one attack.”

A category one attack causes “sustained disruption of UK essential services or affects UK national security, leading to severe economic or social consequences or loss of life”. The UK government expects this type of attack to happen as cyber warfare and Internet-connected control systems increase in popularity, yet that expectation or threat is not limited to the UK. Almost every country has critical national infrastructure, many of which are based on similar hardware and software, so when vulnerabilities are identified and exploited, the impact could be felt anywhere.

How to prevent a category one attack

You’re not in a position to identify and patch every zero-day in your supply chain, so there are no guarantees. Likewise, a category one attack will most likely come from a nation-state attacker with time, money, and legal protection. Our recommendation is to mix board-level awareness with a systematic approach to defence in depth. These best practices allow you to make the right defensive decisions whilst mitigating the impact of an exploited vulnerability.

Step 1: Get the C-suite and board to buy into this threat

We’re in a time when security is top-of-mind at the highest level and you should work hard to ensure senior leaders fundamentally believe that they don’t want to be the company that experiences a category one. Every senior security leader and chief I speak to repeats the importance of governance in business operations. Your job is to convince them that this isn’t a scenario where ‘risk acceptance’ is acceptable. Once you get them on board, you’re able to take the next step.

Step 2: Assess and interpret threat intelligence

Once your leadership is on board, you must assess what you have and what could be vulnerable to a category one, and then seek threat intelligence on those assets. When working with customers, our first step in any job is to try and understand what exists, what could be vulnerable, and then act upon that knowledge.

If you have the senior approval, then take the time to assess your situation and invest in threat intelligence against the systems you have. When new vulnerabilities are disclosed or when other industrial control systems (ICS) are attacked, even if it’s in the academic research versus in the wild, you should have a mechanism to know that and start paying attention to your systems.

Step 3: Continuous visibility

Knowing what is happening in your ICS is vital for identifying and stopping an attack. The marketplace and talent for asset and traffic visibility is growing rapidly, so finding help shouldn’t be hard, but making the decision to capture and analyse traffic to your ICS is essential.

Step 4: Mitigate damage

Finally, once you know what could be vulnerable and have intelligence and monitoring established, you’ll want war game and table-top scenarios to see what fallout could occur. Running these exercises will give you a sense of the damage that could be caused. This then leads to disaster recovery updates, new processes and procedures, and maybe new mitigation technology so breakdowns don’t cascade into category one experiences.

Find out more about BT’s ethical hacking services at https://www.globalservices.bt.com/en/solutions/products/security-ethical-hacking


  Share via Twitter   Share via LinkedIn      

Further reading:

  • ASIS Security Technology Concepts day
    April 2019, Technews Publishing, This Week's Editor's Pick, Security Services & Risk Management
    ASIS SA kicked the tyres of a few technologies at its first Security Technology Concepts day in February.
  • Visible light facial recognition
    April 2019, ZKTeco, Technews Publishing, This Week's Editor's Pick, Access Control & Identity Management, Integrated Solutions
    ZKTeco recently expanded its reach in the facial recognition market with the launch of its new series of visible light facial recognition (VLFR) products.
  • 2019 Internet of Things (IoT) Barometer
    March 2019, This Week's Editor's Pick, Integrated Solutions, IT infrastructure
    A majority of businesses that use IoT technology agree that it has either disrupted their industry or will do so in the next five years.
  • Cathexis wraps up successful national roadshow
    April 2019, Cathexis Technologies, This Week's Editor's Pick, CCTV, Surveillance & Remote Monitoring, News, Conferences & Events, Training & Education
    Cathexis Technologies successfully concluded its national CathexisVision Roadshow. With events held in Durban, Port Elizabeth, Johannesburg and Cape Town.
  • Milestone Systems launches Milestone Marketplace
    April 2019, Milestone Systems, This Week's Editor's Pick
    Milestone Systems introduces Milestone Marketplace, a digital platform for the video technology industry that connects buyers and sellers to co-create solutions.
  • Biodegradable security seals for SA
    April 2019, TruSeal, This Week's Editor's Pick, Asset Management, EAS, RFID, News, Security Services & Risk Management
    The new TruSeal product extension is produced from a special biodegradable material sourced from Malaysia.
  • CCTV operators’ duties to response personnel at crime scenes
    April 2019, Leaderware, This Week's Editor's Pick, CCTV, Surveillance & Remote Monitoring, Security Services & Risk Management
    Control room operators often have a responsibility to monitor response scenes that go beyond the initial detection and response relationship.
  • Cyber/physical perils in hospitality
    April 2019, Wolfpack Information Risk, This Week's Editor's Pick, Cyber Security, Entertainment and Hospitality (Industry)
    How can we prepare for our holidays and avoid becoming the victim of a scam or data breach?
  • Surveillance infrastructure has changed
    April 2019, Capsule Technologies, This Week's Editor's Pick, Integrated Solutions, IT infrastructure
    The processing power required to use AI and deep learning is much higher than companies are used to, making it difficult to use off-the-shelf solutions for server and storage.
  • Rethink security priorities
    April 2019, News, Cyber Security
    Cryptocurrency mining is up 237%, phishing attacks increase by 269%, business email compromise attacks have gone up by 28%.
  • Overcoming the 2019 cyberthreat
    April 2019, IT infrastructure, Cyber Security
    The flexibility of remote working is good, however, the wider a network perimeter has to stretch, the more scope exists for security breaches.
  • Ideal operating temperature?
    March 2019, Leaderware, Technews Publishing, This Week's Editor's Pick, CCTV, Surveillance & Remote Monitoring
    Walk into any CCTV control room in South Africa, whether in the middle of a heat wave or mid-winter, and you will probably see a number of operators wearing jackets, some huddled over slightly in an attempt to get warm.

 
 
         
Contact:
Technews Publishing (Pty) Ltd
1st Floor, Stabilitas House
265 Kent Ave, Randburg, 2194
South Africa
Publications by Technews
Dataweek Electronics & Communications Technology
Electronic Buyers Guide (EBG)

Hi-Tech Security Solutions
Hi-Tech Security Business Directory (HSBD)

Motion Control in Southern Africa
Motion Control Buyers’ Guide (MCBG)

South African Instrumentation & Control
South African Instrumentation & Control Buyers’ Guide (IBG)
Other
Terms & conditions of use, including privacy policy
PAIA Manual
         
    Mobile | Classic

Copyright © Technews Publishing (Pty) Ltd. All rights reserved.