Wearable panic device

October 2018 Editor's Choice, Security Services & Risk Management, Products

MyLifeline, part of Intelligent Monitoring, is a wearable IoT device with a panic button used to call for help from any location that has Vodacom cellular coverage. The device can be bought online in the form of a watch or a pendant.

The devices are self-sufficient, meaning they have their own SIM cards and operate without requiring the user to connect to a cellphone. When in an emergency situation, the user simply presses the panic button for three seconds and a signal is sent to the MyLifeline SAIDSA-approved control room. From there, up to five contacts receive an SMS with your details and the operator can dispatch emergency services to your location, which is determined by the built-in GPS and sent along with the panic signal.

MyLifeline’s Herman Bester, one of the product’s developers, explains that the company already has national coverage from its control room, which operates 24/7 and can implement set operating procedures for each client, such as alerting third-party security companies to the client’s predicament. The web-based control room system is integrated into a few commonly used security management platforms and is also available at no charge to security companies to run in their own control rooms.

When an individual purchases a MyLifeline device, their personal details (such as contacts, medical aid information and so forth) are loaded into the management system’s software and then transferred to the device over the air.

For individuals wishing to make use of the service, after purchasing the device, the cost is R79 per month and the MyLifeline control room will handle your emergencies. This can apply to people working on their own, those who travel frequently, farmers, outdoor fitness fans and even the elderly. MyLifeline is already doing a proof-of-concept project with a large corporation that wants to equip certain of its staff with the devices.

Security companies can add MyLifeline to their client services and share the revenue with MyLifeline. The company provides its management software for free, as well as the SIM cards and data, and integration into different security platforms.

Even though the system is managed by a third-party, the MyLifeline control room still receives the panic information. This can be used as a backup if the alert has not been responded to within a certain time, or as a failover in case the main control room is offline for some reason.

Earlier this year, MyLifeline won the Santam Safety Ideas Campaign, which is run in partnership with the Stellenbosch University’s Launchlab.

For more information, contact MyLifeline, herman@mylifeline.io, www.mylifeline.io



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