Only birds in the sky

October 2019 Home Security

Kaspersky has launched a new solution designed to help organisations and property owners defend themselves from unauthorised trespassing by civilian drones. Through a combination of several sensors – including a new approach to drone detection founded by the company using laser scanning – and machine learning technologies, Kaspersky Antidrone can automatically spot, identify and prohibit unmanned aircraft from entering restricted areas. This is all done without damaging the devices.

In 2018, the global drone market was estimated to be worth $14 billion and is expected to reach $43 billion by 2024. This growth is driven by the potential opportunities and positive changes that the use of unmanned aerial vehicles can bring – from delivering goods and inspecting proposed mining sites or building constructions, through to fulfilling entertainment interests.

However, the mass adoption of this revolutionary technology could be affected by the negative connotations often associated with drones. In fact a recent study in the UK found that only 31% of respondents admitted having a positive attitude towards them. This perception is largely driven by cases of improper or illegal use of unmanned aircrafts. They can be leveraged for spying purposes, injure people through crashing, cause damage to critical infrastructure including nuclear power stations, or disrupt normal operations of an airport, as was the case when the runway of UK airport London Gatwick was closed because of flying drones.

For these reasons it is important to build and maintain trust in the technology and safeguard its role as a key innovation for businesses and individuals, by ensuring that it does not pose a risk to privacy and safety. To help make the use of unmanned aircraft systems safer, reduce the associated risks and increase operator responsibility, Kaspersky has developed its own anti-drone solution.

Kaspersky Antidrone software coordinates the work of several hardware modules provided by partners and distinguishes drones from other objects. The primary detection module searches for drones using video cameras combined with radar, lidar, and audio sensors – depending on the customer’s needs and environment. Using a laser scanner to determine the position of the drone is unique to Kaspersky’s solution, and has not been applied to this field before.

When a moving object is detected in the sky, its coordinates are transmitted to a dedicated server, which then sends them on to a special unit. In accordance with data from the primary detection module, this unit rotates towards the object, tracks it and then the camera zooms in on it. At the same time, a neural network, trained to identify drones among other moving items, analyses the object on the video. If it is distinguished as a drone, the server sends the command to the dedicated module to jam the communication between the device and its controller. As a result, the drone either flies back to the place it took off from or lands in the location where it lost signal with the controller. This means that the device will not be damaged, as there is no physical contact or attack towards the drone.

The software can be delivered as a standalone solution within third-party hardware, as a mobile version (for example, to be used on the top of off-road cars), or integrated with other monitoring systems, including smart home infrastructure.

To find out more visit https://go.kaspersky.com/antidrone.global.html


Credit(s)




Share this article:
Share via emailShare via LinkedInPrint this page



Further reading:

Check your bank statements
October 2019 , Home Security
To prevent nasty surprises, the banking ombudsman urges customers to check statements and raise questions immediately.

Read more...
Yale updates smart home app
October 2019 , Home Security
Yale has announced that its Yale Home app has been updated with new features for smart home users using either Android or Apple devices.

Read more...
Test your alarm system before the festive season
October 2019, Fidelity ADT Security , Home Security
December is almost upon us and making sure your alarm system is in working order ahead of the festive season rush should be a priority.

Read more...
Don’t let your personal information become someone else’s business
October 2019, AVeS Cyber Security , Home Security
The ever-growing use of social media and mobile devices by everyone has opened easy gateways for cyber criminals to steal personal information, identities, and money.

Read more...
Don’t let hotspots pour cold water on solar
October 2019, GoThermal (TeleEye) , Home Security
Thermal cameras are ideal when it comes to the regular inspection of roof-mounted photovoltaic solar panels recommended by the manufacturers.

Read more...
30% of local consumers still use unsupported operating systems
October 2019, Kaspersky Lab , Home Security
Many consumers and businesses still rely on unsupported or near end-of-life operating systems (OS) which is a security risk, according to Kaspersky research.

Read more...
Fidelity scoops top security awards
October 2019, Fidelity ADT Security , Home Security
The private security industry, supported by the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA), hosted the annual Bravery and Crime Prevention Awards.

Read more...
Kaspersky uncovers zero-day in Chrome
October 2019, Kaspersky Lab , News, Cyber Security
Kaspersky’s automated technologies have detected a new exploited vulnerability in the Google Chrome web browser.

Read more...
Digitise your access control
October 2019, dormakaba South Africa , Home Security
With Evolo, you can open your doors using anything from an access card, key fob, or even a smartphone without any extra hardware.

Read more...
Stalkerware on the increase
October 2019, Kaspersky Lab , Cyber Security
The number of users that encountered stalkerware (commercial spyware often used as a tool for domestic espionage) increased by 35% to 37 000 in 2019.

Read more...