Can you survive a cyber attack?

July 2017 Information Security, Security Services & Risk Management

In today’s networked, digital world, the ability to detect, prevent and recover from a cyber-attack is critical. Cyber resilience is thus key to organisational sustainability, says Al de Brito, senior technical analyst at ContinuitySA.

Al de Brito, senior technical analyst, ContinuitySA.
Al de Brito, senior technical analyst, ContinuitySA.

“Cyber resilience – the ability to recover fully from any cyber disaster – has many moving parts. Organisations need to approach it methodically, and the Cyber Resilience Framework provides a comprehensive, flexible structure to ensure that all bases are covered,” he argues.

De Brito says that a number of trends are increasing organisations’ vulnerability to cybercrime. They include growing dependence on cloud computing, the increasing number of industrial devices connected to the Internet, the use of personal devices on corporate networks and the storage of sensitive personal information online. Data has become a valuable corporate asset, and criminal syndicates are devoting huge resources to access it.

The growing importance of ICT systems and the information they contain, and their subsequent vulnerability, has meant that responsibility for ICT governance has moved upwards to the board and C-suite.

To build a cyber resilient organisation capable of withstanding or recovering from cyber attacks, De Brito says that five inter-connected domains need to be used to guide a concerted programme. These domains or pillars make up a comprehensive Cyber Resilience Framework, each with several functions:

Identify. The aim is to develop an organisation’s understanding and management of the risks to systems, assets, data and capabilities. Key functional areas in this domain are:

• The management of all ICT assets, including personnel, devices, systems and facilities.

• Governance, which covers the creation of an information security policy, and ensuring that all legal and regulatory requirements are met.

• Assessment of the cyber risk, including the organisation’s vulnerabilities. Care must be taken to monitor the threat landscape continuously, and to understand the business impacts. The latter will assist in prioritising risk responses.

• Development of a risk management strategy, including establishing relevant processes and obtaining the buy-in of all stakeholders.

Protect. This is perhaps the most important domain area, and covers activities that will develop/ update and implement effective precautions to ensure that all critical infrastructure services can deliver their business purpose. Key functional areas are:

• Controlling access to all ICT assets and facilities. The principle of ‘least privilege’ will inform these measures.

• Implement the right technology (hardware and software) to protect systems and data.

• Motivating and educating everybody within the organisation’s value chain, including partners and suppliers, to create a solid security culture.

• Ensuring data security based on basic considerations of confidentiality, integrity and availability.

• Protection of all information – probably the most important function within the domain.

• Regular maintenance of all access control systems as well as the ICT system components to ensure protection measures are current.

Detect. In this domain, the focus is on activities to identify cybersecurity events. This includes the ability to detect suspicious activity rapidly and assess its impact. Continuous monitoring of all systems, networks and assets is essential, along with vulnerability and penetration testing. Initiatives to maintain, test and improve these detection procedures should also be in place.

Respond. This domain covers all activities required to respond to a detected cybersecurity event. Functional areas include response planning, communications, analysis, mitigation and improvement.

Recover. As important as the Protect phase, this domain covers how to plan a strategy to recover fully from a cybersecurity event. It should include continuous improvement, and communications with the public, customers and all other stakeholders.

“Cyber resilience basically determines how well your organisation can defend its vital ICT systems and assets from attack, and how quickly it can recover when an attack succeeds,” De Brito concludes. “The Framework offers a tried-and-trusted methodology for getting it right.”

For more information contact ContinuitySA, +27 (0)11 554 8050, [email protected], www.continuitysa.co.za





Share this article:
Share via emailShare via LinkedInPrint this page



Further reading:

Local manufacturing is still on the rise
Hissco Editor's Choice News & Events Security Services & Risk Management
HISSCO International, Africa's largest manufacturer of security X-ray products, has recently secured a multi-continental contract to supply over 55 baggage X-ray screening systems in 10 countries.

Read more...
NEC XON shares lessons learned from ransomware attacks
NEC XON Editor's Choice Information Security
NEC XON has handled many ransomware attacks. We've distilled key insights and listed them in this article to better equip companies and individuals for scenarios like this, which many will say are an inevitable reality in today’s environment.

Read more...
iOCO collaboration protection secures Office 365
Information Security Infrastructure
The cloud, in general, and Office 365, in particular, have played a significant role in enabling collaboration, but it has also created a security headache as organisations store valuable information on the platform.

Read more...
Detecting humans within vehicles without opening the doors
Flow Systems News & Events Security Services & Risk Management
Flow Systems has introduced its new product, which detects humans trying to hide within a vehicle, truck, or container. Vehicles will be searched once they have stopped before one of Flow Systems' access control boom barriers.

Read more...
Cybercriminals embracing AI
Information Security Security Services & Risk Management
Organisations of all sizes are exploring how artificial intelligence (AI) and generative AI, in particular, can benefit their businesses. While they are still figuring out how best to use AI, cybercriminals have fully embraced it.

Read more...
A strong cybersecurity foundation
Milestone Systems Information Security
The data collected by cameras, connected sensors, and video management software can make a VMS an attractive target for malicious actors; therefore, being aware of the risks of an insecure video surveillance system and how to mitigate these are critical skills.

Read more...
Surveillance and cybersecurity
Cathexis Technologies Information Security
Whether your business runs a security system with a handful of cameras or it is an enterprise company with thousands of cameras monitoring sites across a multinational organisation, you must pay attention to cybersecurity.

Read more...
Integrate digital solutions to reduce carbon footprint
Facilities & Building Management Security Services & Risk Management
As increasing emphasis is placed on the global drive towards net zero carbon emissions, virtually every industry is being challenged to lower its carbon footprint and adopt sustainable practices.

Read more...
Cyber-armour for a healthcare industry under attack
NEC XON Information Security Healthcare (Industry)
Malicious actors have exploited compromised credentials, a clear and present danger when healthcare providers' reliance on remote access software allows adversaries to disguise themselves as legitimate users and gain unauthorised access to critical environments.

Read more...
Cybersecurity and AI
AI & Data Analytics Information Security
Cybersecurity is one of the primary reasons that detecting the commonalities and threats of what is otherwise completely unknown is possible with tools such as SIEM and endpoint protection platforms.

Read more...